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johnbjr

Trumba Community Member
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  1. Hi, Jill, Did you get a chance to test your idea? Thanks, johnbjr
  2. Hi, Jill, I was wondering whether the Trumba developers had thought more about this feature request, and perhaps put it on the product development roadmap? More scenarios have arisen in which I could definitely make use of this or similar functionality. Thanks, John D.B. University of Washington Alumni Association
  3. Trumba and Google Maps

    Thanks, Jill, that's definitely worth a try. I'll work on it and let you know. By the way, just FYI, here's the URL for the event promotion with the Google map dropped in... http://www.washington.edu/alumni/clubs/hsc/
  4. We're having a series of events around the US this summer. We've got the events described in a Trumba calendar, and use the Trumba information in various ways throughout our Web site. Now, we've come up with the idea that we'd like to provide a map interface to the summer series of events. In other words, visitors to our site would see a map of the US with the location of each event "pinned." Using Google Maps APIs, we can embed a Google map in our Web page, have the location of each event appear as a "pin" on the map, and then have the event description appear when someone clicks on the pin. The event description comes courtesy of XML that we generate out of a separate database that contains lat/long coordinates and event details. I would really love to eliminate the need for this separate database that we have to maintain in addition to the Trumba calendar entries for this event. The closest I can get today is by using the RSS/Atom feed from Trumba. However, if I define custom fields such as latitude and longitude, they won't appear in the RSS feed unless they're "public" fields, but I don't really want this data to appear on the Trumba event descriptions, because it is not very understandable to the average calendar viewer. Is there something I'm overlooking, or some way of manipulating the RSS feed that I've missed? Better yet, perhaps is Trumba working on some kind of API that would provide data more directly to Google? John Burkhardt University of Washington Alumni Association
  5. I would like to publish a Trumba calendar to my organization's Intranet. My idea is that this internal calendar would have events from our public (Internet) events calendar, as well as additional internal-only events. I know I can use secure URLs and mix-ins to accomplish this (mixing events from public calendars into the Intranet calendars I will also create). But, I'm wondering if it's possible to have certain event fields attached to public events that don't display on public calendars, but that I could display on my Intranet calendars? For example, it would be great to have an "Internal Notes" field that contained many details about an event that we get asked via telephone all the time, but that would clutter up the public events calendar (parking info, meal choices, dress code, and so on). I would not publish this field to the event descriptions on the public calendars, but I would publish this field to the event descriptions on the Intranet calendars. That way, our customer service folks could use the Intranet calendar as a knowledge base about our events, yet we'd maintain the efficiency of having just the one Trumba calendar database. Is there any way to accomplish this today? Thanks, John D.B. UW Alumni Association
  6. For a calendar embedded in my Web page, which uses URL parameters to filter the events that are displayed, is there a way to customize the messages that appear in the yellow box which reports search and filter results? For an example, see http://www.washington.edu/alumni/clubs/nyc_new.html and http://www.washington.edu/alumni/clubs/richmond_new.html For the Richmond page, is there a way to change the text so it says something less daunting than "No events match your search criteria"? Perhaps something like "There are no events currently scheduled." Thanks! John D.B. University of Washington Alumni Association
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